A Busy Bee is the Best Bee

“This semester I am going to go to the gym, stay ahead in my work, take as many hours at my job, and spend time with my friends while maintaining a steady sleep schedule and decent diet” is A LOT  easier to say than to follow through with.

My general goal going into any semester is to find a healthy balance between school, work, and friends. Here I am 6th week in and already sleep deprived and drowning in work. Rather than crying about it I decided that I would share some useful tips so stay awake and alert.

School: School comes first ALWAYS and when I say first I obviously mean after family. But this is why you’re here at Oswego to literally go to class. SO GO TO CLASS. Get smarter. Have intelligent conversations, have silly conversations, just as long as you are having them.

Tips about class-If you are not a morning person; don’t try and be one. Schedule afternoon and night classes. If you like to get up early sign up for the 8 am. There is nothing better than having your day over before noon. I also suggest actually getting to know your teacher. Have them know your name, participate in class. Getting to know your teachers can be useful in the long run.

Make money: Jobs are great. They teach you responsibility and give you some disposable income which can be very useful in college (every student is broke and if you aren’t congrats don’t brag). Jumping into a job too soon can be a huge risk. The transition from high school to college is immense. Your first semester is said to be one of the most difficult semesters you’ll have. Don’t stress yourself out even more by adding in a job. Figure out if you can manage one first without one.

Tips about working- I started working on campus my sophomore year. I had successfully completed a whole year of college with around a 3.5 GPA. Working for SUNY Oswego Campus Recreation is something that exponentially contributed to my time management skills. It became less Netflix and more work in the library. I had deadlines for classes and I set deadlines for myself.

Staying healthy: When you’re a college student, you can have your cake and eat it too. No parents, no rules. However, when your jeans get smaller it can be really discouraging. Once in a while, eat an apple. Don’t get fries for lunch and dinner, get a salad sometimes. Just because mom isn’t around doesn’t mean vegetables shouldn’t be either.

Tips on staying healthy- Two words: AIRBORN and WATER. Taking a vitamin can be annoying but college is so germy it is important to be proactive. We have all been sick but the worst thing is waiting until it’s too late. Dying in your residence hall isn’t fun for you, your roommate or anyone for that matter. Take preventative measures (especially in our winters).

Working out: If working out, sports teams, or even participating in gym class wasn’t your thing in high school it is never too late to start! If you were active in high school keep on trucking! Leading an active lifestyle promotes a healthy lifestyle, a better heart, and more active mind. Whether it is once a week or once a day, being active in college has a multitude of benefits.

Tips on being healthy- I met tons of my friends playing intramural sports and going to group exercise classes. It is a nice way to break up the week. Going to a Zumba class gives you a great workout for about 45 minutes and you can go back to lying in bed with Netflix ASAP. PSA: One does not need to have rhythm to partake in Zumba. It is four years later and I still participate in intramurals with the same friends. Intramural sports last about an hour a night. There are men’s leagues, co-ed leagues (called Co-rec) and women’s leagues!

Have fun: School is going to get stressful. If you have a job, it will get stressful. Your pants; sorry but they’ll probably get tighter. BUT with the right support system and good friends, you will be able to survive the toughest of times!!

Tip from a senior- Make these four years count, because they’ll be over before you know it!

Hello!

fullsizerenderHello! My name is Carolyn and sadly I am a second-semester senior. I say sadly because pretty much the last thing I want to think about right now is graduating. Finding a job, leaving my friends, moving to a new city, and leaving Oswego is all too much to think about. I have been extremely fortunate to have had the experiences I have had in the past four years. I’ve been surrounded by the most amazing people and partaken in the greatest adventures.

Here’s a brief run-down of my involvement on campus over the past four years. I’m a double major in Marketing and Public Relations, a TA for MKT 250 and MKT 467, I’ve held on-campus jobs in both the Res Life and Housing and Campus Life departments, I’ve participated in three internships, I’m a member of PRSSA, I traveled abroad with a quarter class to London, helped build a house in Iowa with Habitat for Humanity and played on several intramural sports teams (actually my first time playing a sport was in college haha).

One of my favorite experiences, by far was through my internship experience this summer. I was an Outside Sales Representative for the AroundCampus Group in the SUNY Oswego Market. This meant that every day I was accountable for selling advertising space in the free student planners that are handed out to students each year (make sure you get one!). Not only are they free, but they include deals and coupons for businesses in the Oswego area. This is a great resource for students and the community. I was able to meet several amazing local business owners in the Oswego area and learn about the rich culture of Oswego. Over the course of the semester, I will be sharing these businesses with you and many of the best places to see/visit/and eat at in Oswego!

2017 NYC Career Connections

Hello~ How is your winter break going?

I attended a special event called NYC Career Connections hosted by alumni association on Jan. 12 in NYC. I had a chance to meet alumni and talk about how to get a job in NYC. Any Oswego students who are juniors or seniors can participate in this event.kakaotalk_20170116_134745252

This semester is my junior 2nd semester which is time to think about my future careers. I wanted to meet alumni and get inspiration from them. First, I went Sportsman Channel and met Tom Caraccioli ’89 who is a director of PR in the company. It was a great chance for me to meet him, because I major in PR and I could listen how everything goes in the PR field. I used to experience PR by only textbook, theoretically. At this session, he shared his experiences with us and give us great advice.

kakaotalk_20170116_134738788

and i got this nice cap!!

After the day session, students gathered in the SUNY welcome center and met about 40 alumni participants from the different fields. It started with speech from keynote speaker and we had time for talking with alumni who work at the company which students are interested in. Students brought their resumes and got advice from them and got connections.
                                      kakaotalk_20170116_134743093 kakaotalk_20170116_134741072

I checked and I am in the right track for my future! Strongly recommended to students who just start to build your career.

http://alumni.oswego.edu/s/1552/start.aspx ——–> You can find more information in here!!

Go to the writing center!

 

wchelpful

Hello~ An Nyeong!! Today all classes canceled because of the snow!

BUT i know, you know, we know that we have lots of assignments to do.

Because my major is public relations, usually my assignments are writing papers such as case analysis, persuasion essay and so on.  Even though I studied in English which is my second language, the reason why I could survive in American university is the writing center. Today, I want to talk about how much benefits you can get by going to the writing center before submitting your assignments.

In my case, I’ve always been to writing center, since I was a freshman. In my first semester, I had never wrote an essay in English before, but I had to write an essay in English class. Fortunately, my English professor was a director of the writing center in the time, I got information about writing center and started to visit. I was so shy to show my work to tutors at the first time, but I did to get good grades. Once you showed, it was not hard at all from the second times. Since they know I am an international student and English is not my first language, they explain and help give me more detail so that I can understand. Here are more benefits!

  1. Save your time! (You can organize your thoughts before you actually write down in your paper.)
  2. Be more logical! (The most important factor of your essay is the logic.)
  3. Get rid of typos! (Letting other people read your papers always leads to a better job.)

I believe that your classes are coming down to finals. Please do your best until this semester is done and get good grades for every class you are taking.

Korean say “Fighting!!” when we want to cheer friends up!

FIGHTING!!!! 파이팅!!!

image1

 

Networking 101

Hello everyone!

Whether you are a Communications, Accounting, Health Science, or Education major (etc.) it is so important to begin networking now. I would like to tell you a little story about WHY it is so crucial to network.

When I was applying for internships I had no idea where to start. I began discussing with my Mother possible internships I could apply to, which leads to network one. My Mother set me up with her friend who worked at Newsday Media Company, which is the Long Island Newspaper. From there I was able to land an interview in the Event Marketing Department. I got the internship! At Newsday I met so many great employees. Some who I actually stayed in touch with, which leads to network two. Here at Newsday I met Kim. Kim and I worked very closely together on the events Newsday would be holding. It wasn’t until Kim and I discovered that we were in the same sorority that our friendship expanded.

It is so important to maintain these relationships we make. I reached out to Kim after my internship ended and asked her if she had any connections with anyone at a Radio Station. This is where network number three comes in. Kim set me up with Joe from Connoisseur Media Long Island. This Media Company is the home of five Long Island stations. I was able to send Joe an email because I was already back in Oswego. In the email I stated that unfortunately I  was already back in Oswego, but would love to send him my resume. His response back to me left me speechless. Joe responded with “I would do anything to be back in Oswego”. I was able to send Joe my resume and land an interview at this Media Company. I became a Promotions Intern. After my internship ended I got hired to work on the Events Team.

To sum this all up, I want everyone to be aware with whom they meet. You never know what networking with people can do for your future.

 

My Journey In Japan, Part One

(NOTE: This is one of those blog entries that I probably should’ve started working on much, much sooner. Perhaps one could consider this a testament to the amount of adventures I’ve been having as of late?)

As I write this, I’m not currently in Oswego. Or in New York State. Or even on the North American continent.

Nope, right now I’m in the middle of a semester abroad at Kansai Gaidai University in Hirakata-shi, Osaka, Japan. I’m only halfway through the semester, and I already have found it to be the most worthwhile experience of my entire life. This is the realization of a dream I’ve had since I was in middle school (and probably even before that), and is the culmination of over a year and a half of diligence, hard work, and perseverance.

Eleven years in the making, and I'm finally here...

Eleven years in the making, and I’m finally here…

 

 

I’ve got so many stories to tell about my adventures thus far in Japan that I’ll need more than one post to talk about them. But first, let’s talk about two things that have been fundamental in making this even possible in the first place: choice and responsibility.

This is my senior year. I plan to graduate in May, which means I have a little over a semester and a half before I’m expected to go out into the “real world” so I can “make something out of myself.”

As a Creative Writing major, I get a lot of comments from people asking me what I plan on doing after undergrad with that kind of degree. These comments often have a somewhat derogatory tone to them, as if I’ve somehow wasted all my money on something completely worthless.

Now, this is the part where you’d probably expect me to say something along the lines of, “The Creative Writing major is actually super-versatile, thank you very much,” and then drone on and on about how I could be a technical writer or a PR manager, both of which are rather profitable jobs.

Fortunately, that’s not what I’m gonna do. Instead, I’ll tell you the absolute truth.

The truth is, I don’t know what I plan to do outside in “the real world.” I sure as hell don’t want to spend my life rotting away inside a cubicle at a job I hate just because somebody else told me to. That’s not me; it’s not my kind of environment. Sure, it’s secure, but it’s also boring as hell. As Joseph Campbell (whom I’ll probably get to talking about in a later post) once said, “There is no security in answering the Call to Adventure. Nothing is exciting if you already know what the outcome is going to be.”

Now, where does Japan come into all of this?

Well, it’s simple: I’ve wanted to go to Japan since I was a little kid. Over the years I’ve heard a variety of people say a variety of things about the variety of reasons why it would be impossible and/or stupid to go to Japan.

“It’s too expensive.” (Nah, it wasn’t really.)

“Someone like you wouldn’t survive a week over there.” (Try eight. And counting.)

“You’re too stupid to get into a university over there.” (Honors Program with a 3.3 GPA.)

“What’s the point? You’ll just end up owing boatloads of money over nothing.” (See below.)

“Stop being irresponsible, Tom. Just graduate and get a job like everyone else. Worry about Japan later.” (Again, see below.)

Well, if this post is any indication, in the end I didn’t listen to them, and I’m so glad I chose not to. The truth is, this semester abroad wasn’t just the best decision I’ve ever made, but the most NECESSARY, as well. I’d been exposed to too much cynicism to that point, and I needed to break free.

[*cue minor tangent*]

You see, I hate cynicism. It’s probably one of the worst qualities to find in a person, as it more or less translates as a sign of laziness and apathy (which are two equally terrible character traits). I especially hate when I hear my fellow classmates back home (many of whom are juniors and seniors) whine and moan about how “the last four years have been worthless” and “I still don’t know what I want to do with my life” and “[Insert name here]’s got a degree in [Insert Liberal Arts major here], so he’s gonna be flipping burgers when he gets out of here.”

Here’s the thing: people who say that kind of stuff seem to have missed the point of college; they act like all they need to do is attend class during the week and party during the weekend and they’ll somehow magically figure out who they are and what they want to do. They neglect opportunities like study abroad or clubs and organizations, saying that they’re just a waste of time. School is work, and to them, work should always be separate from play.

And then when they realize they were wrong, they blame it on their parents and other adults who told them that getting a degree was the only important part of their college education.

They couldn’t be more wrong.

See, the thing that so many of those cynical students seem to forget is that college is about learning to make your own decisions, as opposed to following the will of someone else. Thus, whining about how you gained nothing from college is a sign that you didn’t learn how to think for yourself. That’s a skill you often can’t fully learn how to use in a classroom setting; you can only apply it there. You have to learn about yourself and the world around you by actually getting out and being there.

[*end minor tangent*]

Which is where I turn once again to my experiences in Japan. I’ve known for a while that I probably won’t become a full-time writer; for one thing, it’s been hard to come up with something original, and for another, I have a rather short attention span that makes writing for significant length of time somewhat difficult. (Which is why it’s actually kind of weird that this post is as long as it is…)

[*cue another minor tangent; don’t worry, kids, it’s all relevant in the end*]

But I do know one thing: I love stories. I love telling them, I love reading them, and I love learning about how they work. And I also love games; playing games, talking about games, and learning the science behind games.

And I know that I can take these two bits of knowledge and tie them together. And I know that by tying them together I can see the world from an entirely different perspective. And from that perspective I can find things to do and make that can change the world as we know it. Things that take my creative writing and cognitive science backgrounds and turn them into the impetus behind a force of good.

Knowing that, I feel there’s only one choice I can make, because I have a responsibility to myself (rather than to the people around me) to do something extraordinary with my life.

And the best way I can think of is to pursue cognitive video game studies in graduate school.

[*end minor tangent*]

Now, I know what you’re thinking: Man, does that Tom Kline likes his tangents. But trust me when I say that this all ties together rather nicely.

Because when I first came to Oswego as a freshman, my parents and high school teachers had already told me that I had a responsibility to study what interested me, because in doing so I’d learn to appreciate the gift of choice that came with that opportunity. And so I became a Creative Writing major and Cognitive Science minor, and somehow ended up in Japan.

There, we’re back on track.

Now, having finally come to Japan, I’ve been rewarded for my self-faith and conviction by being granted so many other opportunities while being here. My birthday, September 19th, was the day of the Jugoya full-moon festival in Kyoto, and I got to go to a celebration at Shimogumo Shrine. That night, the full moon was said to be the prettiest full moon of the year (in contrast to a similar festival in May, which is said to be the most powerful full moon of the year).

It was a great night.

 

What’s more, I spent the next four days in Tokyo for the Tokyo Game Show 2013, which was an industry expo similar to E3 (the Electronic Entertainment Expo, held every summer in LA). Unlike E3, however, the last two days of TGS are open to the public.

The ticket for TGS 2013

 

While I was there, I got to play a bunch of crazy games that might not even come out in America.

 

This guy was from a Sega game for the Nintendo 3DS that had something to do with fighting using Japanese yen. I barely understood what was going on. At the end of the demo they gave me a box of tissues that looked like a 10,000 yen bill. Japan, people. Video games.

And my favorite part of the trip was getting to meet a bunch of independent game developers. These are two-and-three-man studios who come together to make games on their own terms, free from any corporate meddling. They often make more avant-garde games with interesting mechanics that in turn can influence the rest of the games industry.

Here’s me with the guys at VisionTrick, who are working on a game called Pavilion for the PS4 and PS Vita. There’s an interview with them that I’ll post soon. They were pretty awesome.

Rickard Westman(left) and Henrik Flink (right) of VisionTrick Media. Talking to these guys was really, really cool.

 

And here’s me with Henry Fernandez and his brother, who are working on FluffEaters, a mobile game for Android and iOS devices. An interview with them should also be going up in the near future:

Me with Henry Fernandez (aka Henry Kun), left, and his brother (whose name sadly escapes me at the moment…), right. These guys were also really cool to talk to.

It’s great to talk to these developers because they operate on a more easily-approachable level; they make games, but they’re not Shigeru Miyamoto or Cliff Blezinski (from Nintendo and Epic Games, respectively). You can go up to them and talk about game design and playing games without feeling like you’re speaking to a suit (or, in the cases of Miyamoto and Blezinski, a legend). In a way, these guys are artists who are making their dreams come true by creating something unique for others to experience and interpret and learn from. They could’ve gone and become businessmen, rotting away at a job they hate, but instead they decided to do something awesome with their lives.

Thus, we’re not really different at all: I love games, they love games. I’m in Japan at the Tokyo Game Show experiencing the insanity that occurs within, and so are they. And most importantly, I’m here because I never gave up on my dream, and neither did they.

That week alone was one of the greatest and most life-changing periods of my entire life. And none of it could’ve happened (or at least, not to the extent that it had) outside of Japan. If I hadn’t made the choice of going to Japan now while I’m still an undergrad, I’d be letting down so many of the people who got to where I am today.

But that, friends, is a story for another time. Until next time, stay tuned for more coverage from the Land of the Rising Sun!

Leadership Skills – A.K.A. How to be a Good Community Member

If you think you can do a thing or think you can’t do a thing, you’re right.

-Henry Ford

You may not have known it at the time, but when you decided to come to SUNY Oswego, you entered into a sort of social contract. By making the choice to pursue a higher education degree, you have made the choice to be part of a community. The  community you and I belong to is called SUNY Oswego. The most important part of your end of the contract is your obligation to go to classes and do the work for them, but there is another part of that contract which may not be so obvious: being a valuable member of your community at large. The college has multiple avenues for being active in the greater community, but there is one common thread which holds them all together: you. Without student members of the extracurricular organizations and offices, there would hardly be anything to write home about at this school. And while you may not think your role in whatever group(s) you are a part of is particularly important, it most definitely is. If you take these bits of advice and try to behave more like a leader in your organization, you might see it spring to life and gain more influence and credibility in the community at large.

1. Confidence is key.

We’ve heard it a  million times, but it can’t be stressed enough. If you know what you are talking about (or at least act like you do), people are more likely to listen and believe. But this isn’t about just being outgoing for no reason; I mean to say that if you work hard on something, it will show in the way you talk about it. So, sometimes it isn’t enough to talk the talk if you don’t have something good and tangible to back it up.

2. Dedicate time.

This appears to me to be one of the most common problems facing young student leaders. It is very difficult to set aside time for something when the first thing you learn about college life is the breadth of opportunities and activities available to you as a student. But if you can hone in on a few things and really set aside the hours for them, you will soon find people looking up to you and appreciating your effort and dedication to your club or activity.

3. Organize.

If you can find some solid, meaningful, and well-defined goals for your time here at SUNY Oswego, you’re already two steps ahead of the competition. A good way to do this is to start big and work your way down. Find a few broad goals for yourself and compartmentalize them into smaller, more specific tasks, and keep working your way down more and more until you have found yourself in the possession of a set of tasks that are very easy and not stressful individually.

4. Enjoy what you do.

Most importantly, don’t force anything upon yourself. If an activity is not naturally part of your life, you might find yourself often unmotivated to pursue it. This may seem like common sense to some, however I can say from personal experience and first hand observation that it is very easy to feel the need to do something simply out of obligation to friends or maybe because you feel forced to. The trick is to enjoy helping others in the ways that you most easily can afford to.

Hopefully some of these tips stick with you throughout your college career, and hopefully I have helped you make some connections in your mind on what it truly means to be active and a good member of your community. This is an important skill set, one which will greatly enhance your personal and professional life – after all, that’s what we’re going to college for in the first place, right?

Time Management-How to Successfully Get Your Work Done on Time

Sometimes, your classes can get the best of you.

 

Have you ever put off a huge project until the last day before it’s due? Ever let your homework pile up over the course of the week? These two things can work together to make you feel overwhelmed, stressed, and buried in work. Contrary to popular belief, a pot of coffee and an all nighter are not the solution to this problem. This bolg post is aimed at time management, seeking help in topics you may be struggling in, and how to survive the semester without stressing over being behind in classes.

 

When it comes to time management, there are many courses of action you can take to help keep organized and work in a productive, timely manner. Here are a few methods you can use to help manage your time:

  • Make a schedule for yourself!-When a professor assigns a project that is due in a month, it may be a good idea to utilize all of the time that you have been given to complete the assignment. This usually means that you’re expected to put a lot of work into the assignment. In order to keep on track, make a schedule for yourself. Use a loose leaf piece of paper, calender, etc. to remind yourself what part of the project you should be working on at a given time.
  • Buy yourself a white board!– This is a must have for any college student. A great idea is to keep the white board on the wall next to your bed so you can see whatever reminders you’ve written yourself as soon as you wake up. That way you won’t forget about an assignment that is due. Plan your week out on the board–it will be extremely helpful!
  • Have a smartphone? Use it!-There are some great features in most smartphones that can work wonders when it comes to managing time. Most phones have a notepad, which can be used to write notes to yourself regarding a project or homework assignment. Another great feature is the alarm. Set alarms for yourself to remind you that you should be doing your work. That way you won’t get distracted by whatever you may be doing and lose track of time.
  • Buy a planner!-Planners are a great invention–especially for a college student. Use them to keep track of all of your assignments and their due dates. This way, you can get things done before they start to pile up.
  • Others- Other great ways to stay on track include leaving sticky notes for yourself, or having a trustworthy friend remind you to stay on track.
Sometimes for a student, procrastination occurs because they do not understand the material in class. If this is the case, and you are struggling in a class, here are a few methods to help you bring up your grade and do better on exams, homework, or papers:
  • Office Hours-Most professors on campus have open office hours–which is a specified time on a given day where they are open to students who may wish to come in and seek help on a project, paper, homework assignment, or seek additional instruction in a specific area. Usually office hours are posted in a courses syllabus. If not, consult your professor to see when they are available. This is a great way to establish a good relationship with your professor as well as receive one on one help with whatever you may be struggling with. Professors are always happy to help!
  • Tutoring Services-  SUNY Oswego’s Office of Learning Services provides numerous resources t students who wish to seek extra help with their classes. A great service provided is their tutoring service. If you visit the OLS office (Located in room 171 in the Campus Center), you can request a tutor to help you. Tutors are available for most lower level courses, as well as upper level courses. These tutors are usually undergraduate students, graduate students, or professors who make themselves available to help you.
  • Need someone to proofread your paper? Go to the WRITING CENTER!-Located on the third floor of the Penfield Library, the Writing Center is a great service offered to those who wish to seek help with a writing assignment. If you wish to have somebody read over your paper and help you improve your writing skills. To make an appointment with a writing tutor, go to this web address and follow the instructions. http://www.oswego.edu/academics/support/OLS/wc.html
  • When studying, DON’T CRAM!-Spreading out study sessions over a period of time before your exam will help you to retain the information better. Study one portion of the material at a time. Cramming is stressful and ultimately is not a good way to study. Taking breaks between study sessions is healthy and gives the information time to sink in.
  • Study with a group of friends- Sometimes, working in a group is much better than working alone. If you have a big exam to study for, study with a group and take turns testing each other on the material.
  • Go to the library!-If you feel as if you may be studying in a distracting environment, go to the library to do your work. There are plenty of places in the library that promote productivity and help you to focus on your work and your work alone. For me, just being at the library makes me study harder and focus more.

 

Wait, what month is it?

When I started Graduate School in late August of 2012 graduation seemed distant. Now, in the midst of my second semester, it seems to be coming up quicker than I thought. Though most people will explain Graduate School programs in years, 1-3, in the grand scheme of things Graduate School is only 4 semesters. When you break that down, it’s easy to lose track of time when you think of how the semesters themselves get fragmented with school work deadlines and, before you know it, it’s the end of the semester. 5 months flew by and you can barely remember what you did. This made me think about what was important to me, what I needed for professional development, and what I just needed to do to survive.

It was a hard decision to stop doing certain things that I had become accustomed to doing here at SUNY Oswego for the last few years (I received my Bachelor’s Degree from here, too.) I realized that in order to stay sane it was important that I did things that I wanted to do for me and stop thinking about the big picture 24 hours a day. Professional development is important and taking time out to do that is something everyone should do. However, sacrificing happiness now for future happiness wasn’t how I wanted to live my life. So I changed it. I left some things behind, adopted a new attitude, concentrated on a few things instead of a handful, and opened my self, and my schedule, to new experiences. One of the most important things that I’ve picked up along the way is that personal development, learning more about who you are, will help you in the long run when developing yourself professionally. With a more relaxed schedule no longer filled with the stresses of simply too much to do, my spring semester has slowed down in comparison to the fall of 2012. I take my school work one day at a time and leave enough time for me to relax, go nuts, enjoy food, favorite sporting events, and well- anything else I want.

The semester ends when?!

Like most students on campus, I’ve been as busy as ever juggling  jobs and classes, relationships and hobbies, and most of all… me time. This also means that I neglected updating all of you with how my semester was going. So, here it goes. It’s been a long one. It’s interesting to see how far I can push myself and it’s really rewarding when the grades that come back reflect the work that’s been put in. Graduate school is no joke, but at the same time I feel that this is where I’m supposed to be and that I was prepared for the work. Civic Engagement is going well, we were super busy until the election and now we’re planning for next semester, which is just as time consuming. The Women’s Club Hockey team is off to a decent start, not where we usually are at this point but we picked up our play as of late. Coaching teaches me a lot about leadership roles, professionalism, the game of hockey, and myself. Right now we’re 5-3-0 with a few games left this semester to improve that quite a bit. It’s something that I love to do, though it’s really time consuming. On a lighter note, being a graduate student means no finals! it also means that there are only 8 days left in my semester. Definitely thankful for that. Well, hope all of you are doing well. I’ll try to get on this more often to keep it updated.